medical devices

Impact of the MDR on maintenance of medical equipment

Prepare now for the arrival of the Medical Devices Regulation (MDR) in May 2020. Because the MDR, the new European law for medical devices, is legislation that will be enforced. This was apparent from the meeting organized by Olympus on 24 January in Leiderdorp. New legislation Under the guidance of Juul Dings, Marketing Manager at Olympus, around 70 attendees (mainly medical technicians, clinical physicists, buyers and department managers) were able to hear the impact of the MDR on maintenance of medical equipment.

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Using equipment is more important than owning

It is not a reproach, but a lot of unnecessary runs are made. Healthcare institutions are there to provide care and need tools for this. But actually owning a resource fleet is not a core business. In fact: efficient deployment often only gets in the way. That is why Vegro offers a lease construction. Relieving and saving are the keywords. “Yes, and I would dare to say: save considerably,” says Frank Huiting, account manager for the Northeast region at Vegro.

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From service barriers to a culture of convenience.

Nurses and staff were searching for equipment, walking all over the hospital wasting time, and causing confusion because nobody knew where all of the infusion pumps and beds were located. This should be different thought Martijn de Vries, coordinator of Clinical Engineering for the hospital. Traditionally, nursing departments were managing their own devices. If they ran short on a piece of equipment they had to make numerous phone calls to track down equipment which then had to be brought to them.

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Hospitals pay hundreds of millions too much for medical devices

Hospitals spend hundreds of millions each year on purchasing medical devices. The Gupta consultancy comes to that conclusion after analyzing the sector. The researchers note that hospital administrators and buyers make insufficient efforts to pay the best price for implants, syringes, surgical instruments and other medical devices. They allow themselves to be seduced too much by sales pitch and the (complex) offers of the suppliers. It is high time for hospitals to take a critical look at their procurement process, concludes Kees Isendoorn of Gupta.

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